Urban Deer Studio

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Observing Tomb Sweeping Day (清明节), the Spring Festival of Remembrance

To view more photos and videos of Qingming festivities, browse the #qingming, #清明 and #清明节 hashtags on Instagram.

On the 104th day after the winter solstice, communities across China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and parts of Southeast Asia observe Qingming Festival (清明节 or 清明節), also known as Tomb Sweeping Day.

A bittersweet day for many, families observe the holiday as a time to honor deceased loved ones as well as celebrate the arrival of spring. On Qingming, people visit their ancestors’ grave sites to sweep the tombs, place offerings of food and drink, burn joss papers and say prayers to remember the departed.

Literally translating to “clear bright festival,” the holiday also marks the period on the East Asian lunisolar calendar when the atmosphere becomes clear and bright, the weather warms and signs of spring start appearing. In addition to the commemoration activities, it is also a time for families to go out for picnics, enjoy kite-flying or start spring plowing to take advantage of the coming agricultural season.

High-res whitneymuseum:

Susan Howe’s poems on view in the 2014 Biennial draw on a wide variety of texts, spanning American, British, and Irish poetry and folklore as well as critical and art historical sources. She cuts out sentences and fragments of pages, pasting and taping them to create a new text that retains the typefaces, spacing, and rhythms of the originals. These compositions are then made into letterpress prints.
Susan Howe, Untitled (from Tom Tit Tot), 2013. Letterpress print, 12 × 9 in. (30.5 × 22.9 cm). Collection of the artist. © Susan Howe


Very cool

whitneymuseum:

Susan Howe’s poems on view in the 2014 Biennial draw on a wide variety of texts, spanning American, British, and Irish poetry and folklore as well as critical and art historical sources. She cuts out sentences and fragments of pages, pasting and taping them to create a new text that retains the typefaces, spacing, and rhythms of the originals. These compositions are then made into letterpress prints.

Susan Howe, Untitled (from Tom Tit Tot), 2013. Letterpress print, 12 × 9 in. (30.5 × 22.9 cm). Collection of the artist. © Susan Howe

Very cool

(via poetrybomb)

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Celebrating April Fool’s Day with @mattsteele's Visual Wordplay

For more of Matt’s creative humor, follow @_mattsteele_ on Instagram.

For Ohio Instagrammer Matt Steele (@_mattsteele_), photography doesn’t always have to be a serious matter. For this April Fool’s Day, Matt—who’s “always doing something silly”—shares his thoughts on combining creativity and humor.

"In terms of a photograph, I’m drawn to silliness because it gives me the opportunity to create something unique and share it," Matt explains. "I have an incredibly tight-knit group of friends here in Ohio, and each of us are funny in our own distinct way so we’re always exchanging laughs."

Many of Matt’s photos are visual takes on wordplay and often make up part of his #WHPwhoopsie and #autocorrectgonefishing series, which are either puns on the Instagram Weekend Hashtag Project or scenes built out of humorous autocorrect malfunctions.

As Matt tells it, “The ‘whoopsie’ started when Instagram chose #WHPlighthouse as their weekend project. Arkansas isn’t exactly close to any lighthouses. I thought it would be fun to make a typo out of ‘lighthouse’ and photograph the result by creating something fun and silly, which happened to be a horse with a light bulb glued to it (‘lighthorse’).”

From there, the lighthearted series has grown into a weekly staple, with many looking forward to Matt’s creations and some even creating their own spin-offs as well. “When I posted the first whoopsie, I remember someone telling me to ‘please do this every weekend,’ so it stuck ever since. The encouragement I get to keep creating, as well as seeing other Instagrammers contributing their interpretation of the idea is what keeps me going.”

Can you guess the wordplay behind any of Matt’s photos above? Click on each to see the captions and inspiration for each project.

Happy April Fools!